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ADK Recreation Interactive Trail Map and Trip Planner

Fishing Adventure Guide
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Your ADKTrailMap.com Adventure will be an experience to treasure!

Fishing in the Adirondacks, 1889
Fishing in the Adirondacks, 1889. Painting by landscape artist Windslow Homer.

New York boasts remarkable fishing throughout the state, the Adirondacks being no exception. An abundance of pristine water spanning ponds, lakes, brooks, streams, and rivers awaits in the Adirondacks

To make the most out of your Adirondacks experience, we here at ADKTrailMap.com have assembled a guide to help you have a safe and enjoyable journey while abiding by all New York State fishing laws. Remember to review this guide each time you pack for your trip to ensure that you don't leave anything behind.

The first stop for planning any fishing trip to New York's Adirondack Mountains should be to ADKTrailMap.com. From here you can plan your route by browsing the map; seeing where to park; and exploring an array of other outdoor recreation activities.

ADK Trail Map Interactive Map
ADK Trail Map No Reception Needed App

ADKTrailMap.com is also available on mobile devices with limited features. For full functionality on smartphones, download our free 'Adirondack Trails' app from the either the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store.

Where to Fish

Fishing is permitted on all New York State-owned land. See our app for locations of state owned land (however please use only as a guide). Additionally, the New York State DEC has purchased Public Fishing Rights (PFR) on many sections of privately owned streams and rivers.

For Public Fishing Rights areas, be sure to look for the prominent yellow signs indicating that you are in a PFR. Respecting the land will help ensure that the land will remain a PFR.

Yellow Perch. Photo: NYSDEC
Yellow Perch. Photo: NYSDEC

Fishing areas are accessible from a variety of means. Some areas require hiking considerable distances on former logging roads, while others are accessible via a boat launch.

If boating, please note that some water bodies do not allow boats with internal combustion engines. In these places (generally in water bodies that only have “hand launches” instead of hard surface launches), either only self-powered boats or electric motors and self- powered boats are permitted.

The best fishing locations are, of course, dependent on a number of factors including weather, water temperature and conditions, time of day, and other people's fishing activities. However, included is a small sampling of popular locations that can be used as a starting point.

SAMPLING OF FISHING LOCATIONS

Blue Mountain Lake

Trout, Rainbow, Bass, Brook Trout. Fly fishing, motor boats permitted, accessible for those with disabilities. Hiking not required for fishing access.

Lake George

Annually stocked with landlocked salmon, large natural population of lake trout. Abundance of other species in this popular large Adirondack Lake. Multiple hard-surface boat launches available. Ice fishing permitted when safe.

St. Regis River and Canoe Area

Main River: stocked browns and rainbows. A hydro-electric dam oxygenates water on outflow. East Branch: canoe fishing for Brook Trout. Generally speaking, going upstream will yield better fishing.

Eagle Lake

Stocked by Essex County Fish Hatchery, leading to an abundance of brown trout. Smallmouth bass, northern pike, pickerel, black crappie, yellow perch, and lake whitefish also regularly caught. Motor boat launch.

When to Fish

Open season for many species of fish in the Adirondacks spans spring, summer, and fall, with a few year-round.

Trout season opens the first day of April, but generally the best trout fishing of the season does not occur until late spring. Fishing for other species including Black Bass, Pike, Pickerel, and Walleye also begins in late spring. Unless endangered, most other species are permitted to be caught year-round, such as Yellow Perch.

Don't let winter get you down – if it's safe, head out on to a frozen lake for ice fishing.

Please visit the DEC website for a complete list of fishing regulations.

New York's State Fish: the Brook Trout
New York's State Fish: the Brook Trout

Fishing Licenses

Fishing licenses are required for each person 16 years of age and older for angling, spearing, hooking, longbow, and tip-ups. Note that there are some exceptions to fishing license requirements and free-fishing days do exist throughout the year.

Licenses can be purchased in-person at authorized locations (such as many, but not all, town offices), online, or over the phone. Licenses purchased online are valid immediately and can be printed for use. When purchased over the phone, allow up to 14 days for delivery.

Resident Non-Resident
Annual License
valid 365 days from date of purchase
$25
ages 16-69

$5
ages 70+
$50
Seven Day License $12 $28
One Day License $5 $10

Before You Leave Home

Equipment

To ensure a positive experience, PRIOR to leaving, use our helpful checklist:

Pleasant summer paddle in the Adirondacks
Pleasant summer paddle in the Adirondacks. Photo: dvs/Flickr

General Info

In case of any emergency know the DEC Forest Ranger Adirondacks Emergency Phone Line: 518-891-0235

If you have cell service in the Adirondacks, dialing 911 may direct you to a 911 Dispatcher in a neighboring county or potentially even Vermont. If for any reason a 911 Dispatcher can not assist you, dial the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Phone Line. DEC Forest Rangers are highly trained emergency responders knowledgeable of the geography and subtleties of the Adirondack Mountains.

Fish responsibly