Map out your next Adirondack adventure

ADK Recreation Interactive Trail Map and Trip Planner

Road Biking Adventure Guide
brought to you by...

Your ADKTrailMap.com Adventure will be an experience to treasure!

Biking Whiteface Summit
Summit of Whiteface Mountain in the Adirondacks. Yes, it is possible to bike the 2,000 ft elevation gain to the summit! Photo: Geoffrey Williams/Flickr

Instead of driving the beautiful and scenic corridors of the Adirondack Mountains, consider riding your bike to fully immerse yourself in the sights, sounds, and smells of the mountainous environment. With routes of varying elevation change and ranging from remote corridors with no buildings for miles to scenic paths near large towns, there are routes sure to meet everyone's skill levels and interests.

To help you make the most out of your Adirondacks experience, we here at ADKTrailMap.com have assembled a guide to help you have a safe and enjoyable journey while cycling. Remember to review this guide each time you pack for your trip to ensure that you don't leave anything behind.

The first stop for planning any trip to New York's Adirondack Mountains should be to ADKTrailMap.com. From here you can plan your route by browsing the map; seeing where to park; searching trails by trail type, level of difficulty, distance, and/or name; and exploring an array of other outdoor recreation activities.

ADK Trail Map Interactive Map
ADK Trail Map No Reception Needed App

ADKTrailMap.com is also available on mobile devices with limited features. For full functionality on smartphones, download our free 'Adirondack Trails' app from the either the Google Play Store or the Apple App Store.

Sampling of Road Biking Routes

Wilderness/Intertown Routes

Remote North Routes

Starting and ending in Saranac Lake, this 67 mile route takes you into some very remote areas with scenic water views. Rolling elevation changes exist on the route making it moderately difficult.

An Adirondack Lake
You will see not only fantastic peaks while bicycling along the roads of the Adirondacks, but also sublime lakes and ponds such as this one. Photo: Oleg Dulin/Flickr

Teddy's Trail

Part of this Central Adirondack Route follows the path President Theodore Roosevelt took from Mount Marcy to the North Creek Train Station following President McKinley's death. It is a good option if you are looking for a route that is mostly remote yet with a few major towns dotted along the route. Consider staying overnight along the route in Long Lake, Blue Mountain Lake, or Indian Lake.

In-Town Routes

TOBIE Trail

Short for Thendara, Old Forge, Big Moose, Indian Lake, and Eagle Bay, this trail exists in some segments as an off-street paved route, making it friendly for families and recreational riders, particularly in the Thendara – Old Forge Corridor. In other sections, the trail exists as stone, dust, and dirt.

Moody Pond

This short 3 mile trail is great for a casual ride in Saranac Lake. Enjoy distant views of Adirondack Peaks.

Fish Creek Bike Roads

After pitching your tent or parking your camper, ride your bike around the paths of this large Adirondack campground. Trails total more than 4 miles in the entire campsite.

Before You Leave Home

Equipment

To ensure a positive experience, PRIOR to leaving, use our helpful checklist to make sure no stone is left unturned when packing for the trip.

Road biking on a summer day
Road biking on a summer day in the Adirondacks. Photo: datadriven/Flickr

Adirondacks Mountain Biking Safety and Decorum

In case of any emergency know the DEC Forest Ranger Adirondacks Emergency Phone Line: 518-891-0235

If you have cell service in the Adirondacks, dialing 911 may direct you to a 911 Dispatcher in a neighboring county or potentially even Vermont. If for any reason a 911 Dispatcher can not assist you, dial the DEC Forest Ranger Emergency Phone Line. DEC Forest Rangers are highly trained emergency responders knowledgeable of the geography and subtleties of the Adirondack Mountains.

Respect and help maintain the road corridors. Some content courtesy of the NYS DEC and the IMBA “Rules of the Trail”